Kala Clock

So, I’ve changed the Kala daily clock.

The old clock:

“The Day

The Kala daily clock is divided into three equal 8 hour segments. The morning (yomua), the midday (yotso) and evening (puama). So, when asked what time it is, or when something should happen, instead of 9am or 5pm, one would say (tsima) na’o te yotso or (tsima) na’o te puama.

The new clock:

“The Day

The Kala clock is divided into 8 hours. Each hour is equivalent to three on a traditional, or analog clock. So, 6am is tsima ta’o (hour 2), and punu haue’o ma’e tsima ma’o is 11:30am (This could also be tsima ha’o ma ya’itsa’o (hour 3 and 5/6)).

This means that the day can be divided into 4 equal parts; yomua “morning” is tsima na’o tsaye ha’o “3am until 9am”, yotso “midday” is tsima ha’o tsaye ya’o “9am until 3pm”, puama “evening” is tsima ya’o tsaye tsa’o “3pm until 9pm”, and yohua “night” is tsima tsa’o tsaye na’o “9pm until 3am”.”

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Amal phrase


ne segra duyú budunai
NEG follow.INF emotion-ACC PROX-world-GEN
Don’t follow the sentiment of the world.

Kala phrase


ya nye na yala kanyok | naye na ikaya haninke yala | yalali ke tsaka nayo a
VOC reason 1s go ask-NEG | while 1s PROX-world limit-NEG go | step-each O house 1s.GEN COP
But do not ask me where I am going, as I travel in this limitless world, every step I take is my home.

Kala phrase


otlamaya ke nyelo yatek ku misa tapyak naye tala ma yala
bird-water O remainder abandon-NEG and path follow-NEG while come and go
Coming, going, the waterbirds don’t leave a trace don’t follow a path.

New Kala word

uenye
/wɛːɲe/
income; receipts; earnings; revenue

Kala phrase

kumanila ke suata pue nam inapua to’otli
bear-blue O account after 1pl eat-PFV pay-FUT
Blue-Bear will pay the bill after we finish eating.

sticky

the nun James, the one that works with steel, came over last Tuesday and will cook some hives for us then, after we recycle the moon by burning the volcano with ice and forging the clouds out of stone according to the lessons of the raccoon master that once lived in a hollowed-out watermelon that we painted with oxygen when we found it wrapped with sadness in the clover field next to the abandoned warehouse under which all the friends of my great uncle Walter once ate with hot sauce

the basketballs ain’t swimmin’ right