Kenaya

The kenamoya or kenaya (circle writing) script is used to write Kala. Kenaya is an abugida or alphasyllabary and consonant–vowel sequences are written as a unit: each unit is based on a consonant letter, and vowel notation is secondary. It can be written vertically in columns, or horizontally in rows.

Each glyph consists of an outer circle and an inner circle, or kenauaye and kena’uhe, respectively. The outer circle represents the initial syllable, and the inner circle the second syllable. This means that each glyph represents (CV)CV. Each consonant has an inherent vowel /a/. The kenauaye vowels do not cross into the kena’uhe but stop at the outer boundary. The palatal and velar approximants have two forms, an independent form when not part of a consonant, and a dependent form, when attached to a consonant.

Single syllables are written either with a solid kenauaye or kena’uhe depending on whether they are an affix or particle. In the above, the syllable ke (object marker) is written with the /ke/ as the outside circle and an atsu (solid) as the inner circle. The syllable -ke is an affix that marks the dubitative, derived from ketsa. The ya syllable, the vocative particle is written with the /ja/ as the outside circle and an atsu (solid) as the inner circle. The syllable -ya is an affix that marks a type of writing, or a family member related by law, derived from moya or tlaya, respectively.

Consonants

Vowels

Diacritics

How to form glyphs

1) paka – This simple glyph shows pa as the outer circle, and ka as the inner circle. With /a/ as the inherent vowel in both syllables, not vowel marks or other diacritics are present.

2) paku – This simple glyph shows pa as the outer circle, and ku as the inner circle. The /u/ mark rests horizontally on the right side of the marked syllable.

3) pakyo – This glyph shows pa as the outer circle, and kyo as the inner circle. Note that the /jo/ vowel mark does not cross outside of the inner circle boundary.

4) panka – This glyph shows pa as the outer circle, and nka as the inner circle. The nasalization mark may float, but must be centered inside of the modified syllable.

5) puki – This glyph shows pu as the outer circle, and ki as the inner circle.

6) puaka – This glyph shows pua as the outer circle, and ka as the inner circle. Note that the /wa/ vowel mark does not cross inside of the inner circle boundary.

7) pyoki – This glyph shows pyo as the outer circle, and ki as the inner circle. Note that the outer circle is marked with the /jo/ marker and the inner circle with the /i/ marker.

8) mpaka – This glyph shows mpa as the outer circle, and ka as the inner circle. Note that the nasalization mark is attached to the outer circle.

9) mpekue – This glyph shows mpe as the outer circle, and kue as the inner circle. This glyph demonstrates the complexity possible in all glyphs.

10) pak – This glyph shows pa as the outer circle, and k as the inner circle, marked with the null vowel marker. Like the nasalization mark it may float, but must be centered inside of the modified syllable.

Examples


tsaye sipoko apua opuatlik
until fat-AG sing be.complete-FUT-NEG
It’s not over ’till the fat man sings.


nam ke unyanketle kyoponua – ke hama tamaha namyo unyanko
1pl O understand-NEG-REL fear-FREQ – O defense good-AUG 1pl.POSS know-CONT
We often fear what we do not understand; our best defense is knowledge.


ke tana tayo kapayek
O fight 2SG.POSS be.sufficient-PST-NEG
Your fighting was insufficient.


tlaka misahue yalayetle ke apuani metlanko
man road-LOC walk-PST-REL O song-nice whistle-CONT
A man came walking down the street, whistling a happy tune.

One thought on “Kenaya

  1. Pingback: Kenaya script | Football Bats

Comments are closed.