Amal phrase


ne segra duyú budunai
NEG follow.INF emotion-ACC PROX-world-GEN
Don’t follow the sentiment of the world.

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Kala phrase


ya nye na yala kanyok | naye na ikaya haninke yala | yalali ke tsaka nayo a
VOC reason 1s go ask-NEG | while 1s PROX-world limit-NEG go | step-each O house 1s.GEN COP
But do not ask me where I am going, as I travel in this limitless world, every step I take is my home.

Kala phrase


otlamaya ke nyelo yatek ku misa tapyak naye tala ma yala
bird-water O remainder abandon-NEG and path follow-NEG while come and go
Coming, going, the waterbirds don’t leave a trace don’t follow a path.

New Kala word

uenye
/wɛːɲe/
income; receipts; earnings; revenue

Smoking Fish

manyuk ushudú tabákísh tai semda átela!!!
request-1pl remnant-ACC cigarette-DIM 2s.GEN ground-LOC throw-2s-NEG
Please do not throw your cigarette butts on the ground!!!

kasahim gelum urámsha geshab dakra tabákíshwa ta taduk yudra shawequrum
fish-pl come-3pl water-AUG-ABL night-DUR smoke.INF cigarette-DIM-ACC and try-1pl help.INF quit-TENT-3pl
The fish come out of the sea at night to smoke them, and we’re trying to help them quit.

kusukut
thank-1pl-2pl
Thank you.

Dīzīyutīć

Dīzīyutīć

The Dīzīyutīć alphabet was created by Moab Croft to write his conlang with the same name. It was inspirted by the Tengwar and Greek alphabets. The Dīzīyutīć is a Germanic language based on the idea of how Old English might have developed with significant Greek influence.

This script is not horrible, but I am not a fan of the Tengwar + Greek influence. Functionaly, the Romanization is a bit uncouth, as it looks sloppy. The presentation is good, but could be better with some practice and writing style development. As for the language concept, it doesn’t sound interestiing to me at all…especially because Greek already has influenced English through scientific and medical terminology.

I give this script a 2×3 for aesthetics and functionality respectively.

Tjapingarriwangka

Tjapingarriwangka

The Tjapingarriwangka script was devised by Robert Hancock as a way to write Ngaanyatjarra, a Pama-Nyungan language spoken mainly in Western Australia. The name Tjapingarriwangka means “message stick speech” in Ngaanyatjarra.

This script is interesting mainly because of the language it was created for. The presentation lacks a bit of polish, but that does not diminish the originality. The vowel diacritics are probably the least original part of this script, being simply reduplicated to mark long vowels. The overall feel is that of a South-East Asian script, which seems pretty fitting for a Pama-Nyungan language.

I give this script a 3×3 for aethetics and functionality, respectively.