New Kala word


tiua
/tiːwa/
ramble incoherently; rant

Advertisements

New Kala word


yempu
/jeːᵐpu/
handle; deal with; cope; get by with

New Kala word


tlakunase
web-spider
spiderweb; cobweb

The 4 styles of omyatloko; monumental, handwritten; typed; bulletin

Dhadakha Script

Dhadakha

Dhadakha is a constructed script invented in 2016 by Brian Bourque for his artistic constructed language (artlang), Lortho. It has gone through multiple revisions before it reached the final form in mid-2018. Dhadakha was inspired by Devanagari, Tibetan (uchen), and Tengwar. Currently, the script is solely used to write Lortho.

Originality, linguistical accuracy, and creativity are key components in developing a fully fleshed-out conscript. Dhadakha delivers on all of those fronts. Mr. Bourque’s skill with a pen is apparent and on full display in his Instagram account. The Dhadakha script isn’t just original and unique, but follows linguistic norms the way most neographers only hope to master. Its uniqueness is matched only by its elegance and beauty. Also, a script like Dhadakha has the kind of calligraphic potential that I aspire to in my own scripting.

I give the Dhadakha script a 5×4 for aesthetics and functionality respectively.

Formatting note; Hangul

I will no longer be including Hangul in my translations or neologism posts. I still use it for Kala, I use it everyday in my journal, however, it is cumbersome to transcribe with most online sites and is a mostly unnecessary step as anyone who truly follows this blog likely either doesn’t need the Hangul transcribed for them, or ignores it in favor of the lexical and grammatical features any way.

No worries. My love for the elegance, simplicity, and utilitarian nature of Hangul will never die.

Moya Calligraphy

yama – mountain; hill

Omyatloko WIP

So, I’m still updating and expanding on Omyatloko. I’ve begun to catalog various sets of possible glyphs first by shape and then by position. This seems to be the most efficient way to keep track of the glyphs, and I have tried many ways.

This is an example of one of the “sheets”:

As you can see, it’s the “hand” radical rotated and combined with the vowel markers (which do not actually covey any phonemic information unless said “hand” permutation is assigned a consonant sound).

Some of the sheets are – so far – full of unused glyphs, while others are filled with many already assigned glyphs. All in all, it’s progressing, but there is much left to do.