A bird in the hand…

A few lexical changes…The word for “bird” was tsikua, and had onomatopoeic qualities that I did not like. I borrowed it from Cherokee tsisqua and it was a nice word. Recently, however, during composition of various translations I have grown to dislike it and its ambiguity. I changed it to kuatsi (just reversing the syllables) for a few days until I realized that wasn’t quite going to work either, so, I went back to the drawing board and decided that I would have three terms, one general term for any “endothermic vertebrate, characterized by feathers, toothless beaked jaws, the laying of hard-shelled eggs.” Then I thought it would add flavor and perhaps nuance to have to separate words for birds that fly, and flightless birds.

So, the general term for avian animals is otla, taken from: tototl, flightless birds, such as ostriches, penguins, etc. are referred to as peti, taken from: 3pd, and any bird that flies is referred to as a kusa, taken from: kuş.

These selections are purely aesthetical and meant to add depth to the semantic spectrum within Kala, however, if anyone has any suggestions about how this might impact translations or lexica, please let me know.

Star Trek Discovery vs The Orville

This is the new Star Trek Discovery trailer. And as exciting as it is, I’m uneasy about much of the aesthetic choices, most especially the Klingons. Yes, I know the Klingons have changed a few times, but never this drastically, or for seemingly just the heck of it. Some will point out that when he had the money, Roddenberry changed the look of several aliens…well, yes, he did, but he did it to what we know from the ’80s and ’90s, not this new version. I’m not trying to make the case that new aliens and a modern aesthetic are contrary to good storytelling, that judgment will need to wait until the show actually airs. However, what many fans have come to expect from Trek is a certain level of consistency, and this seems to disregard consistency for what I can only assume is renewed interest.

Keeping in mind that this show will air only its pilot on network television, and then reside behind a paywall, CBS is banking on serious interest that this trailer only barely stirs, at least in someone that has watched Star Trek most of his life. I hope that the show will have success, but given the issues they’ve had with the roll-out, delays, budget and personnel, I fear this show may be shorter lived than Enterprise was.

Meanwhile, this is the trailer for a new show on Fox, starring Seth MacFarlane, creator of Family Guy, American Dad, and so much more. This show looks to be a lighter look at the future and space exploration, almost refreshing given the numerous dystopian themes running through much of network and cable television. This seems like a bit of a coup for Fox as “The Orville” looks more like Trek than the new Trek. It also, by using humor, might have an edge over a show that seems like it might be focusing a bit to much on the drama of space travel…and doing so in horrible stylistic contrast to its predecessors.

I will admit that I am looking forward to both of these shows, but there is reason to bet on the latter having more success than the former if nothing else but because people might want a healthy dose of funny and interesting rather than space battles galore plus drama. The current political climate might just be the thing that sets the shows against each other.

milam kihuyo

Weather icons and vocabulary

pakyotini – spiral storm; tornado
pakyotsene – lightning storm(s)
pakyoha – big storm
pana – rain; rainy
panahi – light rain; drizzle; showers, etc
kihua – clear; fine [weather]
kohu – fog; foggy; mist
manka – cool; cold
nyahi – snow; snowy
nyepa – cloud; cloudy
sama – sun; sunny
samatso – partly cloudy (lit: half-sun)
samahi – partly sunny (lit: sun-small)
saua – wet; humid; damp
seka – dry
sitsa – heat; hot; warm
etsa – temperature; degree
yasa – wind; windy
yelo – hail; freeze; ice; sleet

Planet Names

In keeping with the Kala calendar totems, planet names in Kala are semi-elemental.

tsumakumetal planet — Mercury
nyepakucloud planet — Venus
kaya — Earth
tlatsakufire planet — Mars
itokuwood planet — Jupiter
kenakucircle planet — Saturn
kutankaeagle planet — Uranus
panakurain planet — Neptune
honukuturtle planet — Pluto

The suffix -ku indicates a planet, or large land area. Mars can also be called ketlaku (red planet). Saturn is named for its rings. Pluto is included but is recognized as a dwarf planet and can be called honuhiku (little turtle planet). The word kaya simply means earth and is taken from Gaia.

a silly wish

I don’t want to travel to the future to see the flying cars, self-replicating pizza, or sex robots…no, I want to go to see the society that has forgotten tribalism, ancient fairy tales, and the entire notion of “us vs them”.

David Jablow

https://davidjablow.com/

Mister Jablow’s art is the best type of provocative. It forces one to reconsider preconceived notions, mostly about morality and cultural norms.

My favorite example of his work is:

Innocuous enough, until he takes it in a wondrously detailed direction:

Whether his work is a commentary on society, or simply a jab at things commonly thought of as banal, it serves the viewer a helping of introspection, and in doing so pointedly wets one’s appetite for more.

Bonveni

veni a nosa casa
tua carga es pesosa

el ia dise no
ma nos dise tota no

come con nos
e iniora la ante cuandos

La popla de la mundo debe junta per combate la odia de persones con mentes pico. Ama es plu potiosa ce odia. Vade abrasa lo!