Careful, careful

When discussing ideas, one must be sure not to discuss ideas that find their roots in superstition and faith with the hope or expectation of a rational or logical conclusion.

There is no reason to expect some that refers to themselves as a “believer” to want to have that belief questioned, or at the very least examined by an “outsider”, a “non-believer”. I try to be very careful with this word “believe”, as it seems to assume acceptance without verification…only slightly different than “faith”. Perhaps the distinction is something only I find important, or bother to distinguish. At any rate, I will elaborate below.

I was discussing a myriad of things with a colleague last week. Topics from sports, to chess, to career goals….the topic of belief tiptoed its way into the conversation. I, having enjoyed only a few adult beverages, made a statement that I now regret; “Lilith was Adam’s first wife.” This seemingly innocuous aside lead to a two hour discussion about religious texts which ended in me attempting to explain why I do not have a “belief system”…I failed. Perhaps it was the beers, perhaps it was my exhaustion from the week, or perhaps it was the intractable nature of my colleague’s belief that seems grounded in a personal experience that he says shaped his entire world view. During the discussion I tried to elicit an explanation from him as to why his accepted religious texts were more correct, or the only correct ones, given the sheer volume of religious texts that exist in the world. His statement was fairly predictable “because it’s true.”

Not only do I regret that at times the discussion was contentious, I regret that I involved myself in a discussion where the outcome was not only so painfully predictable, but one that was at its core, completely pointless.

Advertisements

the open sky

the great blue sky
lets all birds fly

it’s inclusive
not illusive

it gives each bird the chance
to do the skyborne dance

perched on the edge of tomorrow
is yesteryear’s sorrow

Planet Names

In keeping with the Kala calendar totems, planet names in Kala are semi-elemental.

tsumakumetal planet — Mercury
nyepakucloud planet — Venus
kaya — Earth
tlatsakufire planet — Mars
itokuwood planet — Jupiter
kenakucircle planet — Saturn
kutankaeagle planet — Uranus
panakurain planet — Neptune
honukuturtle planet — Pluto

The suffix -ku indicates a planet, or large land area. Mars can also be called ketlaku (red planet). Saturn is named for its rings. Pluto is included but is recognized as a dwarf planet and can be called honuhiku (little turtle planet). The word kaya simply means earth and is taken from Gaia.

a silly wish

I don’t want to travel to the future to see the flying cars, self-replicating pizza, or sex robots…no, I want to go to see the society that has forgotten tribalism, ancient fairy tales, and the entire notion of “us vs them”.

David Jablow

https://davidjablow.com/

Mister Jablow’s art is the best type of provocative. It forces one to reconsider preconceived notions, mostly about morality and cultural norms.

My favorite example of his work is:

Innocuous enough, until he takes it in a wondrously detailed direction:

Whether his work is a commentary on society, or simply a jab at things commonly thought of as banal, it serves the viewer a helping of introspection, and in doing so pointedly wets one’s appetite for more.

Wisdom from Leonard Nimoy

asa kue niuahi amahilo uampe pala ehe tomepak pa’e motohue
life like garden-DIM time-DIM-PL perfect can.be but preserve-ABIL-NEG except.for memory-LOC

Kala Phrase


ke kanyom yauapatlek uahe yauam kanyopatlek tamaha
O question-PL answer-ABIL-REL-NEG instead.of answer-PL question-ABIL-REL-NEG good-AUG
Better to have unanswerable questions than unquestionable answers.

This is a paraphrase of a Richard Feynman quote.