Rën alphabet

Rën is a script (ritë) developed by Justin Mann for a philosophical language of the same name (Lokë Rën). It is designed to be easily learned and written while giving it a beautiful and complex appearance.

I always try to applaud cursive style scripts, if for nothing else than the undertaking itself. However, like many before it Rën suffers from fatigue. While the design of the individual characters is simple and seemingly elegant, the resulting text looks more like apoplectic PhD student hurriedly trying to finish the last lines of her dissertation. There’s also the issue of voiced/unvoiced consonants being distinguished by only a diacritic…not something that I favor, most especially in cursive alphabets.

On to the sounds (orthographic representation). I’m not sure there is a natlang precedent for having [θ~ð] contrast with [ʒ] but not have [z]. And as a note on presentation, the page gives IPA for the diphthongs but not the base vowels. I suppose we could assume /a, e, i, o, u/ but that doesn’t seem accurate based on the diphthongs. Also, the use of the umlaut seems wholly unnecessary and likely ill-informed based on the rest of what phonemic information is available.

Over all, this script gets a 3×1 for aesthetics and functionality.

Advertisements

Omyatloko presentation

I’ve been editing a new omyatloko (.pdf) presentation page to go along with the new glyphs and radical system. I would like any and all feedback that any one might have. Thank you.

Laala

Laala

Laala is constructed language devised by Simon Ager, the creator of Omniglot, who was inspired to try creating a language after attending the Language Creation Conference in Horsham in 2015. The aim was to create a minimalist language with words based on sound symbolism and onomatopoeia as much as possible. The name Laala means ‘sing speak’, and it is intended to be quite a musical language suited to singing.

Simon seems to have a knack for scripts that function perfectly. This script is no exception. However, it does have an ever so slight hint of Tengwar, it still is quite aesthetically pleasing and looks more naturalistic than many of Simon’s other scripts. I do worry that his orthographical choices far exceed his choice in transliteration schemes, though. What would make this script’s presentation striking is some handwritten samples…free hand. I imagine this script has some quite interesting calligraphic possibilities, possibilities that are potentially enhanced by the isolating nature of the grammar.

I rate this script 4×4 for aesthetics and functionality.

Sipingmato

Sipingmato

Sipingmato was invented by Lesley Kibat as an alternative way to write Kadazandusun (either Central Dusun or Coastal Kadazan). The name Sipingmato comes from a short version of “Sampaping do Pimato” (Alphabet’s sides). This script is adapted from the Hebrew and Arabic scripts. The Sipingmato letters are similar to Hebrew letters, but some are flipped horizontally.

This script has potential, as many do, but there is an issue with presentation. I’m also not sure that it would function well as a handwritten script. There also seems to be some terminology mistakes on the page, but that very well may be because the author is Malaysian. I would be interested to see a handwritten/calligraphic version of this script.

This script gets a 2×3 for aesthetics and functionality.

Kala Idiom

즈러리 언감바
tsuleli enkampa
/t͡sulɛːli eᵑkaːᵐpa/
thread-each tight-much
Each thread is very tight. (strictly according to the rules; meticulous; not one hair out of place)

Over the next few weeks I plan on exploring idioms on this page and how to express them (or, how I would) in Kala.

Kenaya & Omyatloko

I have republished the pages for Kenaya & Omyatloko as I have begun reworking Omya and plan to post samples of Kenaya from time to time.

https://footballbatsandmore.wordpress.com/hangul-for-kala/kenaya/

https://footballbatsandmore.wordpress.com/hangul-for-kala/kala-glyphs/

Kala Idiom

규 고리 미다요
kue koli mitayo
/kʷe koːli mitaːjo/
as tail dog-GEN
As a dog’s tail = “of course / it’s obvious”

This phrase would be useful if someone doubts what is being said, seen, or given to them.

Over the next few weeks I plan on exploring idioms on this page and how to express them (or, how I would) in Kala.