Dīzīyutīć

Dīzīyutīć

The Dīzīyutīć alphabet was created by Moab Croft to write his conlang with the same name. It was inspirted by the Tengwar and Greek alphabets. The Dīzīyutīć is a Germanic language based on the idea of how Old English might have developed with significant Greek influence.

This script is not horrible, but I am not a fan of the Tengwar + Greek influence. Functionaly, the Romanization is a bit uncouth, as it looks sloppy. The presentation is good, but could be better with some practice and writing style development. As for the language concept, it doesn’t sound interestiing to me at all…especially because Greek already has influenced English through scientific and medical terminology.

I give this script a 2×3 for aesthetics and functionality respectively.

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Tjapingarriwangka

Tjapingarriwangka

The Tjapingarriwangka script was devised by Robert Hancock as a way to write Ngaanyatjarra, a Pama-Nyungan language spoken mainly in Western Australia. The name Tjapingarriwangka means “message stick speech” in Ngaanyatjarra.

This script is interesting mainly because of the language it was created for. The presentation lacks a bit of polish, but that does not diminish the originality. The vowel diacritics are probably the least original part of this script, being simply reduplicated to mark long vowels. The overall feel is that of a South-East Asian script, which seems pretty fitting for a Pama-Nyungan language.

I give this script a 3×3 for aethetics and functionality, respectively.

Mutya Script

Mutya Script

Mutya, or Mutyang Baybayin, was designed by E.M. Rentoria as an alternative way to write Filipino. It is a calligraphic version of the Baybayin script for ornamental use. It also has influences from the Thai and Lanna scripts.

While I too have an appreciation for South East Asian scripts, I think this one falls short in presentation. It also seems to randomly borrow from its source scripts leaving the finished product looking more constructed than borrowed. That’s not necessarily a bad thing, but it sort of misses the mark of being “inspired”. The sample is visually appealing, but it also gives away the issues with an overly complex letter design when trying to create a “calligraphic” script.

I give this script 2X3 for aesthetics and functionality.

Logogram List

So I have added a page to list the logograms of Omyatloko. There are currently 350 logograms, with more being added every week. They will always be sorted alphabetically, but with supplemental lists sorting them by topic being added occasionally.

I am currently revising Kala vocabulary and this project is greatly influencing Omyatloko, so, stay tuned for updates,

Dhadakha Script

Dhadakha

Dhadakha is a constructed script invented in 2016 by Brian Bourque for his artistic constructed language (artlang), Lortho. It has gone through multiple revisions before it reached the final form in mid-2018. Dhadakha was inspired by Devanagari, Tibetan (uchen), and Tengwar. Currently, the script is solely used to write Lortho.

Originality, linguistical accuracy, and creativity are key components in developing a fully fleshed-out conscript. Dhadakha delivers on all of those fronts. Mr. Bourque’s skill with a pen is apparent and on full display in his Instagram account. The Dhadakha script isn’t just original and unique, but follows linguistic norms the way most neographers only hope to master. Its uniqueness is matched only by its elegance and beauty. Also, a script like Dhadakha has the kind of calligraphic potential that I aspire to in my own scripting.

I give the Dhadakha script a 5×4 for aesthetics and functionality respectively.

Rën alphabet

Rën is a script (ritë) developed by Justin Mann for a philosophical language of the same name (Lokë Rën). It is designed to be easily learned and written while giving it a beautiful and complex appearance.

I always try to applaud cursive style scripts, if for nothing else than the undertaking itself. However, like many before it Rën suffers from fatigue. While the design of the individual characters is simple and seemingly elegant, the resulting text looks more like apoplectic PhD student hurriedly trying to finish the last lines of her dissertation. There’s also the issue of voiced/unvoiced consonants being distinguished by only a diacritic…not something that I favor, most especially in cursive alphabets.

On to the sounds (orthographic representation). I’m not sure there is a natlang precedent for having [θ~ð] contrast with [ʒ] but not have [z]. And as a note on presentation, the page gives IPA for the diphthongs but not the base vowels. I suppose we could assume /a, e, i, o, u/ but that doesn’t seem accurate based on the diphthongs. Also, the use of the umlaut seems wholly unnecessary and likely ill-informed based on the rest of what phonemic information is available.

Over all, this script gets a 3×1 for aesthetics and functionality.

Omyatloko presentation

I’ve been editing a new omyatloko (.pdf) presentation page to go along with the new glyphs and radical system. I would like any and all feedback that any one might have. Thank you.